Roses Varieties Printed In   RED   Are New Additions For 2018

 

Own-Root Rose Bush
Transplanting Instructions

A. Garden Location

  1. Minimum – 6 hours Sum
  2. Good Drainage & Air Circulation
  3. No Competition with tree roots.

B. Soil Mixture

  1. 1 cup of 46% superphosphate
  2. 1 cup of dolomitic lime
  3. 2 cups of alfalfa meal or pellets OR 1 cup of MILL’S MAGIC ROSE MIX
  4. 1 cup gypsum
  5. 1/4 part compost (approx. 2 gallons)
  6. 1/4 part peat moss (approx. 2 gallons)
  7. 1/4 part rich top soil (approx. 2 gallons)
  8. 1/4 part red clay, if available

C. Procedure

  1. Dig hole at least 18 inches deep/wide (remove approx. 8 gallons soil)
  2. Refill hole with approx. 10 inches of above soil mixture (see B) for 1 gal. bush.
  3. Carefully remove rose bush with rootball and soil in tact.
  4. Plant bush in front slightly raised.
  5. Refill hole with remaining soil mix, fir soil around rootball – leave no air pickets.
  6. WATER – extremely deep – key to actively growing rose bush.
  7. Water every 4 to 5 days for first season
  8. Use only LIQUID FERTILIZER the first growing season… Apply in 3 to 4 week intervals.
  9. Start a spray program for disease immediately and continue monthly.
  10. Forceful watching of foliage weekly will help fish spider mites.
  11. Spray for insets only as needed. 

FOR BEST RESULTS: Repot rose bush in a 2 gallon
container, grow off for several months then plant in rose bed or continue to grow the plant in it’s container and enjoy…container grown plants will need to be stepped
up as plants mature.

We at Roses Unlimited
USE, RECOMMEND, & SELL
    MILLS MAGIC ROSE MIX MILLS EASY FEED

MILLS MAGIC ROSE MIX, a blend of alfalfa meal, cotton seed meal, fish meal & activated bio-solids, should be mixed into the soil surface in a spring application and repeated in the fall.
MILLS EASY FEED, a liquid fertilizer applied monthly
during the growing season
provides magnesium, sulfate, seaweed extract, chelated iron,
fish solubles, & N, P, K, for vibrant healthy growth.

*NOTE: Rose bushes are greenhouse grown. Do Not expose New Plants to FROST or FREEZING Temperatures during the SPRING of 2018…*